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Karl Marx on Social Classes in a Letter to John Mayer Report (Assessment)

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Dear John,

I am Karl Marx. I share your sentiments on alienation and pain in lower-class imprisonment by the ruling class who have the resources to manipulate and twist social, religious, development, and political aspects of the society as opined by Macionis and Gerber (2007). It is apparent that these classes, drawn from the bourgeoisies and the ruling elites, are not brighter than the rest. However, they thrive in discrimination and exploitation of labor supply to satisfy their selfishness.

Since they are the masters of labor production tools such as wages, this group, comprising of just a small percent of the society, comfortably sits on the apex of Maslow’s hierarchy of needs pyramid. In union with your sentiments, I concur that they influence democratic processes that are ‘only democratic’ when the same meet their opinionated threshold characterized by mere confirmation of their will; which may not necessarily be in line with the will of the majority.

I recall once in the textile industry, in the remote province in Germany, when I witnessed the oppression of laborers by an agent of this group. Funnily, nobody among the other workers and the union came out strongly to defend their members. They talked as though every word from their mouths were rehearsed and choreographed by the exploiters themselves.

Also, I am sorry to report to you that the group has formalized its definition partial policies in education, media, churches, economic sector, politics, and social interaction (Waiting on the World to Change, 2010). I am touched by your passionate appeal to the proletariats to rise above the normal way of life and start to question these biased policies and governance of labor which we provide to them for peanuts.

In a perfectly skewed labor market, wages are supposed to be determined by the cost of production and total output. Unfortunately, this is not the case. We are merely spectators of exploitation as though our hands and minds are imprisoned in the dungeon of social classes (Mayer, 2006). In my opinion, there is hope Mr. John. Everything is not lost, because we are the majority and providers of labor resources.

Noting that this bourgeoisie cannot operate and meet their selfish goals minus our labor, we can unite and move from mere spectators into agents of quantifiable and desirable change we long to witness and live in. By forming independent labor unions and actively participating in electoral processes, proletariats can rise to become a powerhouse and a boat that cannot be rocked by small tides of discrimination originating from premature economic waves.

Interestingly, the world has enough resources for everyone when selfishness is locked from imprisoning our minds. It is time for the proletariats to reject the theoretical education systems and embrace an inclusive syllabus. This is because the development and perception of an individual are greatly influenced by events in his or her external environment such as the type of education received, religious doctrines, and the social media of interaction (Macionis & Gerber, 2007). At present, these are skewed towards fulfilling the selfish ambitions of the minority who are the ruling class.

In conclusion, I would opine that we change our perception towards unfair class systems which are as imprisoning as the caste system in India. However, in our case, the classes are not permanent. Once the mind is liberated, the physical body will respond appropriately.

References

Macionis, J., & Gerber, L. (2007). Sociology, Sixth Canadian Edition with MySocLab Starter Kit. Pearson Ottawa: Education Canada.

Mayer, J. (2006). . Web.

. (2010). Web.

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