Top 26 Funny Tongue Twisters from 21 Countries

Top 26 Funny Tongue Twisters from 21 Countries

Tongue twisters were created in the 19th century for fun and entertainment. They quickly became a tool for speech therapy and preparation before public speaking. These hard-to-pronounce words and phrases work as a physical exercise for your tongue, lips, and cheeks. Even kids who don’t appreciate forced learning can be thrilled by them.

Nevertheless, people have continued to view tongue twisters as a fun challenge. They’ve come up with numerous imaginative sequences that may lack sense but never amusement. With tongue twisters, training your pronunciation skills becomes more intriguing than tiring. And you shouldn’t be ashamed to admit that even today tongue twisters are entertaining to repeat!

On this list, you’ll find utterances that are known for being humorous yet helpful. You can practice them on friends or family members and make them laugh. Be sure to compare how the humor changes from country to country, from language to language. It may even change your perspective on other cultures.

Top 26 Funny Tongue Twisters from 21 Countries Infographics

Our Huge International Collection of Tongue Twisters

LanguageNumber of twisters
Acholi, Acoli or Lwo2
Afrikaans14
Akan or Asante1
Albanian18
Alur1
Amharic, Ethiopian, or Amarigna4
Arabic41
Aragonese2
Armenian17
Assamese3
Avar or Avaric1
Azerbaijani or Azeri3
Basque, Euskara or Euskera21
Bengali or Bangla8
Breton3
Bulgarian19
Catalan45
Chinese, Mandarin27
Chinese, Yue or Cantonese11
Croatian, Serbian and Bosnian36
Czech 154
Danish37
Dutch170
Emilian and Romagnol6
English 595
Esperanto23
Estonian33
Finnish82
French 202
French Creole5
Frisian4
Fulah, Fulani or Peulh1
Ga1
Galician6
Ganda or Luganda4
Georgian or Kartveli25
German 362
Greek, Ancient3
Greek, Modern46
Guarani2
Gujarati8
Hausa4
Hawaiian1
Hebrew38
Hebrew, Ancient2
Hindi24
Hungarian74
Ibanag or Ybanag4
Icelandic13
Igbo or Ibo3
Indonesian39
Irish17
Italian 99
Japanese 40
Javanese13
Jersey22
Kannada or Kanarese9
Kazakh3
Kikuyu14
Korean12
Kurdish4
Latin37
Latvian or Lettish16
Letzeburgesch or Luxembourgish5
Lithuanian12
Loglan or Lojban7
Lombard4
Luo or Dholuo3
Madurese or Madura2
Malay13
Malayalam24
Maltese17
Maori1
Marathi9
Mizo, Lushai or Lusei1
Mongolian5
Norwegian63
Occitan or Gascon3
Panjabi or Punjabi8
Pashto or Pushto3
Persian or Farsi21
Polish 81
Portuguese 98
Rhaeto-Romance or Romansh3
Romanian35
Russian 92
Rwanda or Kinyarwanda2
Sardinian3
Scots or Scottisch4
Scottish Gaelic6
Shona2
Sicilian10
Slovak 40
Slovenian or Slovene17
Soga, Lusoga, Olusoga3
Somali11
Sorbian, Upper3
Spanish 170
Sukuma1
Swahili15
Swedish45
Tagalog or Filipino33
Tamil15
Telugu11
Thai13
Tibetan, Central or Bhotia1
Turkish38
Ukrainian9
Urdu16
Uzbek104
Vietnamese22
Visayan or Cebuano6
Welsh10
Wolof3
Xhosa or IsiXhosa11
Yiddish2
Yoruba8
Zulu5
Comments

Reza
Reza

Very entertaining and informative, Ruth! Here’s another old one that you mightn’t know – in Catalan:
Setze jutges d’un jutjat mengen fetge d’un penjat. Si el penjat es despenja, els setze jutges del jutjat no podran menjar més fetge del penjat.
I’ll let you work out the translation yourself 😉

Ivy Panda
Ivy Panda

I’m happy you liked the infographic, Reza 🙂 We have this tongue twister listed here Catalan Tongue Twisters